benefits of omega 3 6 9 on skin

خواص دارویی و گیاهی

The Best Organic Skin Care


Love Your Skin


December 14, 2016 by Andrea 23 Comments


All fatty acids are made up of chains of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. What makes fatty acids differ is their molecular configuration.

Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are also known as omegas. There are three types of omega fatty acids: omega 3, omega 6 and omega 9.

These fatty acids are important in skin care because they affect how an oil behaves on the skin.

In this article you will learn:


Omega 3’s are polyunsaturated fatty acids that have their first double bond located at the third carbon from the omega end. ​They are considered an essential fatty acid because the body cannot produce them on its own.

Omega 6′ are polyunsaturated fatty acids that have their first double bond located at the sixth carbon from the omega end. ​ They are considered an essential fatty acid because the body cannot produce them on its own. Found in meat, poultry and eggs, as well as nut and plant based oils.

Omega 9’s are a monounsaturad fatty acids that have their first double bond located at the ninth carbon from the omega end. Omega 9’s can be produced by the body, but are also beneficial when obtained in food.​ Found in vegetable, nut and seed oils.

​More Info is available here*


*This link leads to a website provided by the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. The Best Organic Skin Care is not affiliated or endorsed by the Linus Pauling Institute or Oregon State University.

Omega fatty acids are required by our body for a number of functions, including healthy skin. Consuming a diet rich in these fatty acids will ensure that our bodies do not become deficient. Topical application is an effective method for delivering these fatty acids directly to the skin, where they can protect and nourish our skin’s layers.

The two fatty acids that are important to topical application and skin care are: oleic acid (omega 9) and linoleic acid (omega 6).

Oils high in oleic acid are richer and heavier in consistency. They are extra-occlusive and seal in moisture really well.

Oleic acid is absorbed well by the skin, has anti-inflammatory and skin softening properties.

Oils high in oleic acid have a longer shelf life than oils high in linoleic acid.


These oils are especially suitable for people with dry skin.


Oils high in linoleic acid are lighter and thinner in consistency. They nourish and protect the skin without being too heavy.

Linoleic acid can restore the skins barrier function and reduce scaling on your skin.

People with acne have been shown to have low levels of this acid in their skin.


Oils high in linoleic acid have a short shelf life unless the oil also contains an abundance of antioxidants.

These oils work well on those with oily skin.


Omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) also has topical benefits for the skin.


Omega-3 fatty acids help the skin retain moisture, regulate oil production, and maintain elasticity. Topical application of omega-3 fatty acids lessens UV-induced photodamage, external signs of aging, and anti-inflammatory skin responses. Learn more here.

I am only including the fatty acids that fall under the Omega 3, 6, 9 spectrum. There are other fatty acids contained in these oils, but I have not included them in the table below.

Oil


Oleic Acid (omega 9)


Linoleic Acid (omega 6)


a-Linolenic Acid (omega 3)


Apricot Kernel


69.6%


23.3%


0.22%


Avocado


65.4%


14.7%


0.8%


Castor


7%


5%


0.5-1%


Emu Oil


47.4%


15.2%


0.9%


Grapeseed


15.8%


69.6%


0.1%


Tamanu


41.4%


29.7%


0.2%


Baobab


30-40%


24-34%


1-3%


Rice Bran


38.4%


34.4%


2.2%


Kukui Nut


17-34%


27-52%


17-34%


Raspberry Seed


11.7%


52.1%


22.2%


Hemp


11-13%


54-56%


24-26%


Cranberry Seed


20-25%


35-45%


25-35%


Chaulmoogra


21.8%


29.3%


31.2%


Brazil Nut


36-45%



33-38%


Rosehip


13.9%


44.1%


33.9%


Sacha Inchi


8.28%


36.8%


48.6%


Chia Seed


7.3%


18.9%


63.8%


Shiso (Perilla) Seed


14.9%


17%


64%


Amaranth


22-26%


46-50%



Argan


43-49%


29-36%



Babbasu


10%




Borage


17.9%


38.8%



Camellia


82%


10%



Coconut


5-10%


1-2.5%



Evening Primrose


8.4%


72.6%



Jojoba


11.2%




Maracuja


10.7%


72.6%



Marula


70-78%


4-7%



Pomegranate


6.2%


7.1%



Prickly Pear


20.6%


61%



Pumpkin Seed


23.3%


57.2%



Sea Buckthorn


28.4%


6.8%



Sesame


39.2%


45.6%



Sweet Almond


50-86%


20-30%



Watermelon Seed


15%


63%



Black Cumin Seed


23.7%


57.9%



Safflower


17%


78%



Hazelnut


74%


17%


>1%


Guava Seed


9.17%


76.5%



Sunflower (high linoleic)


20%


69%



Different skin types will do best with different fatty acids.


Recommended Oils: Marula or Avocado.


Recommended Oils: Raspberry Seed or Prickly Pear.


Recommended Oils: Pumpkin Seed or Prickly Pear.


Recommended Oils: Tamanu or Argan.


Recommended Oils: Marula or Argan.


Recommended Oils: Hemp or Sunflower Seed.


Recommended Oils: Raspberry seed or Pomegranate


Recommended Oils: Raspberry seed or Prickly Pear.


Looking at the omega fatty acids within an oil can give us a good indication of how the oil will benefit our skin. I hope that the above information is valuable to you and your search for the perfect oil.

There are other considerations to choosing an oil such as Vitamin E content, Polyphenol content and its vitamin/mineral content. Stay tuned for future posts about these other factors.

Have any questions? Leave them in the comments, we always answer! if you liked this article, be sure to share it with your friends.

Yours In Beauty, Andrea


References:


 


Filed Under: Articles, Oil, Skin Type Tagged With: carrier oil, linoleic acid, oleic acid, thrive

Andrea is a mother of three and a lover of the green life. She is passionate about helping people make the switch to a non-toxic lifestyle and find amazing natural skin care. Learn more about Andrea here. And if you have a passion that you would love to share with others, click here to learn how to share what you love – on your own website!

Jenny says


December 15, 2016 at 3:06 pm


This article just blew my mind! I have had the goal of switching to organic/natural skincare for a while now. However, I’d also like to simplify my skincare regime and products. Despite the complex nature of the information you provided, this info is actually really straightforward and simple – choose an oil with the right balance of omegas for your skin type!

How can I follow your site so that I will be notified of new posts? Thanks for the valuable info ?

Andrea says


December 16, 2016 at 6:55 am


Thanks Jenny, I worked really hard on this one ? Using facial oils is one way to really simplify your skin care routine. You can use them as makeup removers, you can oil cleanse and you can use them in place of a moisturizer. They are magnificent! You can subscribe to our website and get a weekly email of our latest posts. There is a subscribe box on the sidebar and one on our about page.

OSOTB says


December 15, 2016 at 3:54 pm


I’ve never seen all of this information laid out in one place, so it was nice being able to get all the info at once, as well as refer back to certain sections if I forgot which omega corresponds to which acid type. Definitely going to go try either pumpkin seed or prickly pear oil!

Andrea says


December 16, 2016 at 6:53 am


A reader actually suggested this topic, she wanted to have a place where she could see the fatty acid amounts of each of the common facial oils, so I thank her for giving me the idea ? Pumpkin seed and Prickly Pear are lovely oils. I am using prickly pear right now and I love the way it feels on my skin.

Aleksandra says


December 18, 2016 at 6:31 am


Awesome article! Thank you so much for taking a time to write about the omegas!


Andrea says


December 18, 2016 at 10:10 am


You are welcome Aleksandra!


Santiago says


December 15, 2016 at 6:37 pm


Hello Andrea ! Thank you for this post. My girlfriend is trying to switch to a non.toxic lifestyle and all this information helps a lot..Knowing which fatty acids are the ones that complement better the skin is great I will surely share all this knowledge about skin care.

Best wishes


Santiago


Andrea says


December 16, 2016 at 6:52 am


Thanks Santiago. We put a lot of work into our articles. We try to make them thorough, but simple to read. Hopefully your girlfriend can benefit from this article. Let us know if she has any questions!

Jane Gostev says


May 24, 2017 at 3:22 pm


I love this article. So informative!! Thank you for writing it. I was looking for the best oil to buy for my type of skin and this is the best article I found.

I do want to point one one thing: you recommend “sunflower oil for acne prone skin, but this oil is not listed in the table, only safflower oil is, which is different from sunflower oil, even though both plants belong to the same botanical family. Just FYI, maybe you can add sunflower oil to the table. ?

P.S. I bought Tamanu oil (before reading this) and love it even though my skin is oily, but recently I also purchased Black cumin seed and Safflower seed oils and love both as well. I want to try Sunflower oil too, so I can finally st one that is the best for my skin.

Andrea says


May 25, 2017 at 6:08 am


Thanks Jane, yes I do need to add sunflower oil to this list. I will do that right now! I am so happy to hear that you found oils that you like. Tamanu oil is really nice, I found it a little thick, but still really nice for oily/breakout prone skin. Black cumin seed oil is great! I have only just recently been introduced to it. I have just started using a new skin care line called MOSS. It is organic luxury skin care made specifically for adult acne. MOSS uses black cumin seed oil, safflower oil and tamanu oil, among other ingredients. So far this skin care has been working great for my acne.

Manika says


May 31, 2017 at 7:26 pm


Wonderful summary! Just what I was looking for


Andrea says


June 1, 2017 at 6:21 am


Thanks Manika ?


Maggie says


July 6, 2017 at 4:03 pm


Oh my gosh Andrea, what a labor of love! This took a you a good bit of time. Thank you for doing this for everyone, bringing order to valuable, but scattered bits and pieces of information! We all simply have to start making informed, wiser, healthier choices rather than continuing to be led down the ‘path of least resistance’. Thanks so much!!

Andrea says


July 7, 2017 at 7:07 am


Thanks so much for the kind words Maggie! And you are welcome ?


Dustin W. J. says


October 7, 2017 at 3:55 pm


Thanks for the info! I’ve recently taken up soapmaking and I’m trying to learn absolutely everything that I can about: skin types, the do’s and don’ts of each skin profile, etc. This, in order to be able to provide a more complete product to the people who want it.

Since the beginning I’ve been struggling to understand the relationships of the fatty acid profiles to skin types. While I still have some unanswered questions and some dark corners that need lit up, your information is an immense stepping stone on my way to fully understand the way our skin and hair work and what they need in order to be their absolute healthiest.

Thanks again for a simplified version of this, somewhat intimidating topic.


P.S. I plan to delve DEEP into the archives of this website in order to find the answers to my questions and lamps to light up my “dark corners as it were. Lol!

Andrea says


October 11, 2017 at 6:28 am


Thanks so much Dustin, glad you found the information useful ?


Saloni Kesarwani says


November 22, 2017 at 2:38 am



Andrea says


November 22, 2017 at 7:15 am


Hi Saloni, Where are the omega 3’s coming from in your supplement? I am not sure if you would also need flaxseed if you are already taking a supplement. Might be a good idea to incorporate some topical oils into your skin care. Chia seed is a great option for omega 3’s. Check out these articles:

Chia Seed Oil Skincare BenefitsTop 10 Best Natural Face Oils for Acne : Get Clear Skin

Gina says


January 20, 2018 at 11:23 am


Curious if you have read much about Borage Seed Oil? I started using ShiKai brand unscented Borage Therapy lotion and it did amazing things for the dry skin on my hands. It seemed to just absorb better than anything! It’s an Omega-3 and has the highest quantity of linolinec acid of all seed oils.

Andrea says


January 22, 2018 at 6:46 am


Hi Gina, I have read a bit about borage seed oil and have been meaning to write an article about it! I grow borage i my garden, it is such a lovely plant that the bees absolutely love! Thanks for stopping in, and check back for an article about borage seed oil coming soon ?

Dionne says


March 29, 2018 at 9:49 am


Have you heard of moringa oil? Can this be use for Ance prone skin too?


Andrea says


March 30, 2018 at 9:22 am


Hello Dionne, thanks for your question. Yes, I have heard of Moringa oil. This oil has a very high (75%) oleic acid content, so it isn’t very good for acne-prone skin, it would be better for dry skin types.

Let me know if you have any other questions!


Jimmy Souchester says


June 30, 2018 at 9:43 pm


Ouch! After one month of use, Prostanew (4 tabs/day) seems to work very much better than saw palmetto (6 tabs-450mg ea/day) alone which were only partially helpful. I will continue to use Prostanew to test its long-term performance, but so far I am very satisfied and have already ordered my second shipment. I hope this helps. Jimmy Souchester

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Copyright © 2018 · Wellness Pro on Genesis Framework · WordPress · Log in


The Best Organic Skin Care


Love Your Skin


December 14, 2016 by Andrea 23 Comments


All fatty acids are made up of chains of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. What makes fatty acids differ is their molecular configuration.

Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are also known as omegas. There are three types of omega fatty acids: omega 3, omega 6 and omega 9.

These fatty acids are important in skin care because they affect how an oil behaves on the skin.

In this article you will learn:


Omega 3’s are polyunsaturated fatty acids that have their first double bond located at the third carbon from the omega end. ​They are considered an essential fatty acid because the body cannot produce them on its own.

Omega 6′ are polyunsaturated fatty acids that have their first double bond located at the sixth carbon from the omega end. ​ They are considered an essential fatty acid because the body cannot produce them on its own. Found in meat, poultry and eggs, as well as nut and plant based oils.

Omega 9’s are a monounsaturad fatty acids that have their first double bond located at the ninth carbon from the omega end. Omega 9’s can be produced by the body, but are also beneficial when obtained in food.​ Found in vegetable, nut and seed oils.

​More Info is available here*


*This link leads to a website provided by the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. The Best Organic Skin Care is not affiliated or endorsed by the Linus Pauling Institute or Oregon State University.

Omega fatty acids are required by our body for a number of functions, including healthy skin. Consuming a diet rich in these fatty acids will ensure that our bodies do not become deficient. Topical application is an effective method for delivering these fatty acids directly to the skin, where they can protect and nourish our skin’s layers.

The two fatty acids that are important to topical application and skin care are: oleic acid (omega 9) and linoleic acid (omega 6).

Oils high in oleic acid are richer and heavier in consistency. They are extra-occlusive and seal in moisture really well.

Oleic acid is absorbed well by the skin, has anti-inflammatory and skin softening properties.

Oils high in oleic acid have a longer shelf life than oils high in linoleic acid.


These oils are especially suitable for people with dry skin.


Oils high in linoleic acid are lighter and thinner in consistency. They nourish and protect the skin without being too heavy.

Linoleic acid can restore the skins barrier function and reduce scaling on your skin.

People with acne have been shown to have low levels of this acid in their skin.


Oils high in linoleic acid have a short shelf life unless the oil also contains an abundance of antioxidants.

These oils work well on those with oily skin.


Omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) also has topical benefits for the skin.


Omega-3 fatty acids help the skin retain moisture, regulate oil production, and maintain elasticity. Topical application of omega-3 fatty acids lessens UV-induced photodamage, external signs of aging, and anti-inflammatory skin responses. Learn more here.

I am only including the fatty acids that fall under the Omega 3, 6, 9 spectrum. There are other fatty acids contained in these oils, but I have not included them in the table below.

Oil


Oleic Acid (omega 9)


Linoleic Acid (omega 6)


a-Linolenic Acid (omega 3)


Apricot Kernel


69.6%


23.3%


0.22%


Avocado


65.4%


14.7%


0.8%


Castor


7%


5%


0.5-1%


Emu Oil


47.4%


15.2%


0.9%


Grapeseed


15.8%


69.6%


0.1%


Tamanu


41.4%


29.7%


0.2%


Baobab


30-40%


24-34%


1-3%


Rice Bran


38.4%


34.4%


2.2%


Kukui Nut


17-34%


27-52%


17-34%


Raspberry Seed


11.7%


52.1%


22.2%


Hemp


11-13%


54-56%


24-26%


Cranberry Seed


20-25%


35-45%


25-35%


Chaulmoogra


21.8%


29.3%


31.2%


Brazil Nut


36-45%



33-38%


Rosehip


13.9%


44.1%


33.9%


Sacha Inchi


8.28%


36.8%


48.6%


Chia Seed


7.3%


18.9%


63.8%


Shiso (Perilla) Seed


14.9%


17%


64%


Amaranth


22-26%


46-50%



Argan


43-49%


29-36%



Babbasu


10%




Borage


17.9%


38.8%



Camellia


82%


10%



Coconut


5-10%


1-2.5%



Evening Primrose


8.4%


72.6%



Jojoba


11.2%




Maracuja


10.7%


72.6%



Marula


70-78%


4-7%



Pomegranate


6.2%


7.1%



Prickly Pear


20.6%


61%



Pumpkin Seed


23.3%


57.2%



Sea Buckthorn


28.4%


6.8%



Sesame


39.2%


45.6%



Sweet Almond


50-86%


20-30%



Watermelon Seed


15%


63%



Black Cumin Seed


23.7%


57.9%



Safflower


17%


78%



Hazelnut


74%


17%


>1%


Guava Seed


9.17%


76.5%



Sunflower (high linoleic)


20%


69%



Different skin types will do best with different fatty acids.


Recommended Oils: Marula or Avocado.


Recommended Oils: Raspberry Seed or Prickly Pear.


Recommended Oils: Pumpkin Seed or Prickly Pear.


Recommended Oils: Tamanu or Argan.


Recommended Oils: Marula or Argan.


Recommended Oils: Hemp or Sunflower Seed.


Recommended Oils: Raspberry seed or Pomegranate


Recommended Oils: Raspberry seed or Prickly Pear.


Looking at the omega fatty acids within an oil can give us a good indication of how the oil will benefit our skin. I hope that the above information is valuable to you and your search for the perfect oil.

There are other considerations to choosing an oil such as Vitamin E content, Polyphenol content and its vitamin/mineral content. Stay tuned for future posts about these other factors.

Have any questions? Leave them in the comments, we always answer! if you liked this article, be sure to share it with your friends.

Yours In Beauty, Andrea


References:


 


Filed Under: Articles, Oil, Skin Type Tagged With: carrier oil, linoleic acid, oleic acid, thrive

Andrea is a mother of three and a lover of the green life. She is passionate about helping people make the switch to a non-toxic lifestyle and find amazing natural skin care. Learn more about Andrea here. And if you have a passion that you would love to share with others, click here to learn how to share what you love – on your own website!

Jenny says


December 15, 2016 at 3:06 pm


This article just blew my mind! I have had the goal of switching to organic/natural skincare for a while now. However, I’d also like to simplify my skincare regime and products. Despite the complex nature of the information you provided, this info is actually really straightforward and simple – choose an oil with the right balance of omegas for your skin type!

How can I follow your site so that I will be notified of new posts? Thanks for the valuable info ?

Andrea says


December 16, 2016 at 6:55 am


Thanks Jenny, I worked really hard on this one ? Using facial oils is one way to really simplify your skin care routine. You can use them as makeup removers, you can oil cleanse and you can use them in place of a moisturizer. They are magnificent! You can subscribe to our website and get a weekly email of our latest posts. There is a subscribe box on the sidebar and one on our about page.

OSOTB says


December 15, 2016 at 3:54 pm


I’ve never seen all of this information laid out in one place, so it was nice being able to get all the info at once, as well as refer back to certain sections if I forgot which omega corresponds to which acid type. Definitely going to go try either pumpkin seed or prickly pear oil!

Andrea says


December 16, 2016 at 6:53 am


A reader actually suggested this topic, she wanted to have a place where she could see the fatty acid amounts of each of the common facial oils, so I thank her for giving me the idea ? Pumpkin seed and Prickly Pear are lovely oils. I am using prickly pear right now and I love the way it feels on my skin.

Aleksandra says


December 18, 2016 at 6:31 am


Awesome article! Thank you so much for taking a time to write about the omegas!


Andrea says


December 18, 2016 at 10:10 am


You are welcome Aleksandra!


Santiago says


December 15, 2016 at 6:37 pm


Hello Andrea ! Thank you for this post. My girlfriend is trying to switch to a non.toxic lifestyle and all this information helps a lot..Knowing which fatty acids are the ones that complement better the skin is great I will surely share all this knowledge about skin care.

Best wishes


Santiago


Andrea says


December 16, 2016 at 6:52 am


Thanks Santiago. We put a lot of work into our articles. We try to make them thorough, but simple to read. Hopefully your girlfriend can benefit from this article. Let us know if she has any questions!

Jane Gostev says


May 24, 2017 at 3:22 pm


I love this article. So informative!! Thank you for writing it. I was looking for the best oil to buy for my type of skin and this is the best article I found.

I do want to point one one thing: you recommend “sunflower oil for acne prone skin, but this oil is not listed in the table, only safflower oil is, which is different from sunflower oil, even though both plants belong to the same botanical family. Just FYI, maybe you can add sunflower oil to the table. ?

P.S. I bought Tamanu oil (before reading this) and love it even though my skin is oily, but recently I also purchased Black cumin seed and Safflower seed oils and love both as well. I want to try Sunflower oil too, so I can finally st one that is the best for my skin.

Andrea says


May 25, 2017 at 6:08 am


Thanks Jane, yes I do need to add sunflower oil to this list. I will do that right now! I am so happy to hear that you found oils that you like. Tamanu oil is really nice, I found it a little thick, but still really nice for oily/breakout prone skin. Black cumin seed oil is great! I have only just recently been introduced to it. I have just started using a new skin care line called MOSS. It is organic luxury skin care made specifically for adult acne. MOSS uses black cumin seed oil, safflower oil and tamanu oil, among other ingredients. So far this skin care has been working great for my acne.

Manika says


May 31, 2017 at 7:26 pm


Wonderful summary! Just what I was looking for


Andrea says


June 1, 2017 at 6:21 am


Thanks Manika ?


Maggie says


July 6, 2017 at 4:03 pm


Oh my gosh Andrea, what a labor of love! This took a you a good bit of time. Thank you for doing this for everyone, bringing order to valuable, but scattered bits and pieces of information! We all simply have to start making informed, wiser, healthier choices rather than continuing to be led down the ‘path of least resistance’. Thanks so much!!

Andrea says


July 7, 2017 at 7:07 am


Thanks so much for the kind words Maggie! And you are welcome ?


Dustin W. J. says


October 7, 2017 at 3:55 pm


Thanks for the info! I’ve recently taken up soapmaking and I’m trying to learn absolutely everything that I can about: skin types, the do’s and don’ts of each skin profile, etc. This, in order to be able to provide a more complete product to the people who want it.

Since the beginning I’ve been struggling to understand the relationships of the fatty acid profiles to skin types. While I still have some unanswered questions and some dark corners that need lit up, your information is an immense stepping stone on my way to fully understand the way our skin and hair work and what they need in order to be their absolute healthiest.

Thanks again for a simplified version of this, somewhat intimidating topic.


P.S. I plan to delve DEEP into the archives of this website in order to find the answers to my questions and lamps to light up my “dark corners as it were. Lol!

Andrea says


October 11, 2017 at 6:28 am


Thanks so much Dustin, glad you found the information useful ?


Saloni Kesarwani says


November 22, 2017 at 2:38 am



Andrea says


November 22, 2017 at 7:15 am


Hi Saloni, Where are the omega 3’s coming from in your supplement? I am not sure if you would also need flaxseed if you are already taking a supplement. Might be a good idea to incorporate some topical oils into your skin care. Chia seed is a great option for omega 3’s. Check out these articles:

Chia Seed Oil Skincare BenefitsTop 10 Best Natural Face Oils for Acne : Get Clear Skin

Gina says


January 20, 2018 at 11:23 am


Curious if you have read much about Borage Seed Oil? I started using ShiKai brand unscented Borage Therapy lotion and it did amazing things for the dry skin on my hands. It seemed to just absorb better than anything! It’s an Omega-3 and has the highest quantity of linolinec acid of all seed oils.

Andrea says


January 22, 2018 at 6:46 am


Hi Gina, I have read a bit about borage seed oil and have been meaning to write an article about it! I grow borage i my garden, it is such a lovely plant that the bees absolutely love! Thanks for stopping in, and check back for an article about borage seed oil coming soon ?

Dionne says


March 29, 2018 at 9:49 am


Have you heard of moringa oil? Can this be use for Ance prone skin too?


Andrea says


March 30, 2018 at 9:22 am


Hello Dionne, thanks for your question. Yes, I have heard of Moringa oil. This oil has a very high (75%) oleic acid content, so it isn’t very good for acne-prone skin, it would be better for dry skin types.

Let me know if you have any other questions!


Jimmy Souchester says


June 30, 2018 at 9:43 pm


Ouch! After one month of use, Prostanew (4 tabs/day) seems to work very much better than saw palmetto (6 tabs-450mg ea/day) alone which were only partially helpful. I will continue to use Prostanew to test its long-term performance, but so far I am very satisfied and have already ordered my second shipment. I hope this helps. Jimmy Souchester

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Comment


Name *


Email *


Website


Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.


By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website. *


Check out the blog for articles, recipes, product reviews, and more.


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› Ingredient Dictionary


Omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids are all important dietary fats.


Interestingly, each one has a number of health benefits for your body.


However, it’s important to get the right balance of omega-3, -6 and -9 fatty acids in your diet. An imbalance may contribute to a number of chronic diseases.

Here is a guide to omega-3, -6 and -9 fatty acids, including what they are, why you need them and where you can get them.

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats, a type of fat your body can’t make.


The term polyunsaturated refers to their chemical structure, as poly means many and unsaturated refers to double bonds. Together they mean that omega-3 fatty acids have many double bonds.

Omega-3 refers to the position of the final double bond in the chemical structure, which is three carbon atoms from the omega or tail end of the molecular chain.

Since the human body can’t produce omega-3s, these fats are referred to as essential fats, meaning that you have to get them from your diet.

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends eating at least two portions of oily fish per week, which is rich in the omega-3s EPA and DHA (1).

There are many types of omega-3 fats, which differ based on their chemical shape and size. Here are the three most common:

Omega-3 fats are a crucial part of human cell membranes. They also have a number of other important functions, including:

Unfortunately, the Western diet does not contain enough omega-3s. A deficiency may contribute to chronic diseases like obesity, diabetes and heart disease (32).


Like omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids.


The only difference is that the last double bond is six carbons from the omega end of the fatty acid molecule.

Omega-6 fatty acids are also essential, so you need to obtain them from your diet.


These fats are primarily used for energy. The most common omega-6 fat is linoleic acid, which can be converted into longer omega-6 fats such as arachidonic acid (ARA) (33).

Like EPA, ARA is used to produce eicosanoids. However, the eicosanoids produced by ARA are more pro-inflammatory (34, 35).

Pro-inflammatory eicosanoids are important chemicals in the immune system. However, when too many of them are produced, they can increase inflammation and inflammatory disease (36).

Although omega-6 fats are essential, the modern Western diet contains far more omega-6 fatty acids than necessary (37).

The recommended ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in the diet is 4:1 or less. However, the Western diet has a ratio between 10:1 and 50:1.

Therefore, although omega-6 fats are essential in the right quantities, most people in the developed world should aim to reduce their omega-6 intake (37).

Nevertheless, some omega-6 fatty acids have shown benefits in treating symptoms of chronic disease.

One study showed that taking a high dose of GLA supplements significantly reduced a number of symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (38).

Another interesting study found that taking GLA supplements in addition to a breast cancer drug was more effective at treating breast cancer than the drug alone (39).

Omega-9 fatty acids are monounsaturated, meaning they only have one double bond.


It is located nine carbons from the omega end of the fatty acid molecule.


Oleic acid is the most common omega-9 fatty acid and the most common monounsaturated fatty acid in the diet.

Omega-9 fatty acids aren’t strictly essential, meaning they can be produced by the body. In fact, omega-9 fats are the most abundant fats in most cells in the body.

However, consuming foods rich in omega-9 fatty acids instead of other types of fat may have a number of beneficial health effects.

One large study found that high-monounsaturated fat diets could reduce plasma triglycerides by 19% and bad very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol by 22% in patients with diabetes (41).

Another study found that feeding mice diets high in monounsaturated fat improved insulin sensitivity and decreased inflammation (42).

The same study found that humans who ate high-monounsaturated fat diets had less inflammation and better insulin sensitivity than those who ate diets high in saturated fat (42).

You can easily obtain omega-3, -6 and -9 fatty acids from your diet.


However, it is important to get the right balance of each. The Western diet contains far more omega-6 fats than necessary, and not enough omega-3 fats.

Here is a list of foods that are high in omega-3, -6 and -9 fatty acids.


The best source of omega-3 EPA and DHA is oily fish.


However, you can also obtain these omega-3s from other marine sources, such as algal oils. ALA, on the other hand, is mainly obtained from nuts and seeds.

There are no official standards for daily omega-3 intake, but various organizations offer guidelines.

According to the Food and Nutrition Board of the US Institute of Medicine, the adequate intake of omega-3s per day is 1.6 grams for men and 1.1 grams for women, for adults 19 years and over (43).

Here are the amounts and types of omega-3s in one serving of the following foods:


Omega-6 fats are found in large amounts in refined vegetable oils and foods cooked in vegetable oils.

Nuts and seeds also contain significant amounts of omega-6 fatty acids.


According to the Food and Nutrition Board of the US Institute of Medicine, the adequate intake of omega-6s per day is 17 grams for men and 12 grams for women, for adults from 19–50 years old (43).

Here are the amounts of omega-6s in 100 grams (3.5 oz) of the following foods:


As you can see, it is very easy to get more than enough omega-6s through your diet.


Omega-9 fats are also common in vegetable and seed oils, as well as nuts and seeds.


There are no adequate intake recommendations for omega-9s, since they are non-essential.

Here are the amounts of omega-9s in 100 grams of the following foods:


Combined omega-3-6-9 supplements usually provide each of these fatty acids in suitable proportions, such as 2:1:1 for omega-3:6:9.

Such oils can help increase your intake of omega-3 fats, which should be consumed more in the Western diet.

In addition, these oils provide a healthy balance of fatty acids so that the balance of omega-6 to omega-3 is less than 4:1.

However, since most people already consume too many omega-6s, and omega-9s are produced by the body, there is no general need to supplement with these fats.

Therefore, it is best to focus your diet on getting a good balance of omega-3, -6 and -9 fatty acids. This should involve eating at least two portions of oily fish per week and using olive oil for cooking and in salad dressing.

In addition, try to limit omega-6 intake by limiting your consumption of other vegetable oils and fried foods that have been cooked in refined vegetable oils.

If you do not get enough omega-3s in your diet, it is best to take an omega-3 supplement alone rather than a combined omega-3-6-9 supplement.

Much like other oils, polyunsaturated fatty acids are easily oxidized when exposed to heat and light.

Therefore, if you’re buying an omega-3-6-9 supplement, choose one that is cold pressed. This means the oil has been extracted with limited heat, minimizing the oxidization that can damage the fatty acid molecules.

To ensure you are taking a supplement that isn’t oxidized, choose one that contains an antioxidant such as vitamin E.

Additionally, select a supplement with the highest omega-3 content — ideally more than 0.3 grams per serving.

Furthermore, since EPA and DHA have more health benefits than ALA, choose a supplement that uses fish oil or algal oil, rather than flaxseed oil.

Although combined omega-3-6-9 supplements have become very popular, they generally provide no additional benefit over taking omega-3 alone.

Omega-6s are essential in certain quantities, but they are in many foods and people following a Western diet already consume too many of them.

Additionally, omega-9 fats can be produced by the body and are easily obtained in the diet, so you don’t need to take them in supplement form.

Therefore, although combined supplements contain optimal omega 3-6-9 ratios, taking just omega-3s will likely provide you with the most health benefits.

An evidence-based nutrition article from our experts at Authority Nutrition.


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According to research conducted at Harvard University, omega-3 fatty acid deficiency is officially one of the top 10 causes of death in America, claiming the lives of up to 96,000 people each year. Out of the 12 dietary, lifestyle and metabolic risk factors examined in the study, omega-3 fatty acid deficiency ranked as the sixth highest killer of Americans. (1) These deaths are considered preventable since getting enough omega 3-fatty acids in your diet can ward off this now common cause of death, and fish oil benefits omega-3 intake as a potent omega-3 source.

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The fish oil benefits include decreasing the risk of heart disease and stroke while also helping reduce symptoms of depression, hypertension, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), joint pain, arthritis and chronic skin ailments like eczema. (2) Fish oil intake has also been associated with aiding the body in weight loss, fertility, pregnancy and increased energy. Preion fish oil has even been approved by the FDA to lower unhealthy high triglyceride levels. (3)

Most of the fish oil benefits exist because it’s one of nature’s richest sources of omega-3 fatty acids. While certain fish oil claims aren’t accurate, I will go over the proven scientific evidence that demonstrates the true benefits of fish oil.

Fish oil comes from the tissues of oily fish. The best sources are cold-water, fatty fish. When it comes to human consumption of fish oil, you can get it from fish themselves or from a fish oil supplement.

Fish oil is a concentrated source of omega-3 fats, which are also called ω-3 fatty acids or n-3 fatty acids. To get more scientific, omega-3s are long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, or PUFAs. Our bodies are able to make most of the fats we need need, but that’s not true for omega-3 fatty acids. When it comes to these essential fats, we need to get them from omega-3 foods or supplements.

Fish oil contains two very important omega-3 PUFAs. I’m talking about docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). DHA and EPA are sometimes called the marine omega-3s because they mainly come from fish. Some of the best fish to eat to obtain fish oil from in your diet include wild-caught salmon, herring, white fish, sardines and anchovies.

There are so many fish oil benefits. These are just some of the top scientifically proven fish oil benefits I want to make you aware of.

Many members of the medical community, like myself, believe that suboptimal levels of omega-3 fatty acids may contribute to symptoms of ADHD and related developmental problems as well as many other mental health problems over one’s lifetime. (4)

A 2012 study involved children from 6 to 12 years of age with ADHD who were being treated with methylphenidate and standard behavior therapy for more than six months. The parents of these children reported no improvement in behavior and academic learning using these standard treatments. The researchers randomly gave some of the children an omega-3 and omega-6 acid supplementation or a placebo. They found “statistically significant improvement for the omega group in the following categories: restlessness, aggressiveness, completing work and academic performance. (5)

Another study found that increasing omega-3 intake, specifically DHA, may improve literacy and behavior in children with ADHD. (6) Fish oil is believed to work via its effects on brain function, which makes sense when you consider that 60 percent of the brain is composed of fats. (7)

For several years now, the fish oil and Alzheimer’s disease connection has been studied with consistent results. The essential fatty acids vital for brain function that are found in fish oil can not only slow cognitive decline, but can help prevent brain atrophy in older adults. A study published in the FASEB Journal looked at the health effects of four- to 17-month dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants. The findings once again confirm the potential for fish oil to be used as a weapon to fend off the onset of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. (8)

Another study conducted by researchers at Rhode Island Hospital examined the relationship between fish oil supplementation and indicators of cognitive decline. The subjects of the study were older adults: 229 cognitively normal individuals, 397 patients with mild cognitive impairment and 193 patients with Alzheimer’s disease. They were assessed with neuropsychological tests and brain magnetic resonance imaging every six months while taking fish oil supplements. The study found that the adults taking fish oil (who had not yet developed Alzheimer’s and did not have genetic risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s known as APOE ε4) experienced significantly less cognitive decline and brain shrinkage than adults not taking fish oil. (9)

The European Journal of Neuroscience published a study in 2013 showing that fish oil reversed all anxiety-like and depression-like behavior changes induced in rats. This is an interesting study because it stresses the importance of supplementing with fish oil at “critical periods of brain development. (10) This is exactly why I recommend giving fish oil to our kids from early on to help them so they won’t develop anxiety or depression later in life.

An 18-month study was published in 2014 that evaluated how borage seed oil — rich in GLA — and fish oil rich fared against each other in treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It was discovered that all three groups (one taking fish oil, one taking borage oil and one taking a combination of the two) “exhibited significant reductions in disease activity, and no therapy outperformed the others. For all three, “meaningful clinical responses were the same after nine months. (11)

This is great news for both fish and borage oil when it comes to arthritis patients, but it’s critical to emphasize that the results were the same because taking too many supplements is simply a waste of money.

Another study also showed that omega-3 fish oil supplements worked just as well as NSAIDs in reducing arthritic pain and are a safer alternative to NSAIDs. (12)

Scientific studies have found that fish oil can help to prevent and kill various cancers, including colon, prostate and breast. (13a) Not only has research proven that it makes conventional cancer drugs more effective, but it’s also an effective stand-alone therapy in natural cancer treatment. Intravenous fish oil lipid emulsions, in particular, are rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which exhibit anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. (13b)

A scientific review published in 2013 looked at omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and prostate cancer prevention. Researchers concluded that there’s a great deal of evidence suggesting that omega-3s have antiproliferative effects – which means they inhibit cancer cell growth – in cancer cell lines, animal models and humans. In addition, the “direct effects on cancer cells and indirect anti-inflammatory effects on the immune system fighting the cancer likely contribute to the ability of omega-3 fatty acids to inhibit tumor growth. (14)

A group out of India conducted a study published in Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology based on the premise that “fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been preferred to chemosensitize tumor cells to anti-cancer drugs. The study found that using 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) to treat colorectal cancer along with fish oil increased the survival rate in carcinogen-treated animals. Researchers also found that the fish oil ameliorated hematologic depression, along with gastrointestinal, hepatic and renal toxicity caused by the 5-FU. (15)

A scientific review in 2014 evaluated study findings on omega-3 intake in relation to the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, the most prevalent cancer among women. The review found that EPA and DHA, as well as ALA, can differentially inhibit breast tumor development. According to this review, there is solid evidence to support the use of omega-3s as “a nutritional intervention in the treatment of breast cancer to enhance conventional therapeutics, or potentially lowering effective doses. (16) Additionally, a 2016 study found that “very high fish consumption in early adulthood to midlife may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. (17)

Fish oil also looks to be helpful for another type of cancer experienced by women: endometrial cancer. A scientific study recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition finds that “long chain omega-3 intake associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk only in normal-weight women. (18a)

In the 2017 issue of The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, the effects of fish oil supplementation was looked at in regard to prostaglandins in normal and tumor colon tissue. In lab rats given colon cancer, the impact of the colonic fatty acid milieu on the formation of prostaglandins and other eicosanoids was examined. (18b)

For 21 days, a diet with fish oil or a standard American diet was given, and it was shown that dietary fish oils for colon cancer prevention was effective. “This could extend to other preventive agents that function by reducing inflammatory stress, said the authors.

According to the Cardiovascular Research Institute in Maastricht in Netherlands, “Epidemiological studies show that replacing fat with carbohydrates may even be worse [than the Western-type high-fat diet] and that various polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA) have beneficial rather than detrimental effects on CVD (cardiovascular disease) outcome. This includes fish-oil fatty acids with anti-inflammatory properties, which can help prevent and reverse a plethora of cardiovascular diseases. (19)

Studies have also found that omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil are associated with improved survival rates for heart attack victims. A study published in the medical journal Circulation found that people who took a high dose of fish oil each for six months following the occurrence of a heart attack actually improved their hearts’ overall functioning and also reduced biomarkers of systemic inflammation. (20)

 


 


We’ve already seen that fish oil can help with depression-like symptoms in rats, but what about people? A study published in the journal Nutritional Neuroscience evaluated the effects of fish oil supplementation on prefrontal metabolite concentrations in adolescents with major depressive disorder. Researchers found that there was a 40 percent decrease in major depression disorder symptoms in addition to marked improvements in amino acid and nutrition content in the brain, specifically, the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. (21)

A study published in Brain Research shows how far-reaching fish oil can be for people with diabetes. Researches found that fish oil can help reduce the risk of diabetics from developing cognitive deficit because it protects the hippocampus cells from being destroyed. The study also showed that fish oil could help reduce oxidative stress, which plays a central role in the development of diabetes complications, both microvascular and cardiovascular. (22)

Another recent study shows that fatty fish consumption can cut the risk of eye-diabetes complications. The researches tracked the seafood consumption of about 3,600 diabetic men and women between the ages of 55 and 80 for nearly five years. The researchers found that people who regularly consumed 500 milligrams each day of omega-3 fatty acid in their diets (equal to two servings of fatty fish per week) were 48 percent less likely to develop diabetic retinopathy than those who consumed less. (23)

Combined, this shows consuming fish oil benefits diabetics and that fish oil sources should be included as part of a diabetic diet plan.

There’s more good news when it comes to fish oil and eye health, and it’s just not just for diabetic this time. Fish oil has been shown to reverse age-related eye disorders. In March 2014, French researchers evaluated 290 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and they discovered that dietary oil fish and seafood intake were significantly lower in AMD patients. Due to the high EPA and DHA levels in fish oil, it was concluded that this kind of nutritional intervention could especially benefit those at high risk for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. (24)

A higher intake of polyunsaturated fats like those found in fish and fish oils have also been linked to reduced levels of cortical cataracts.

An animal study revealed that when the antioxidant astaxanthin is combined with fish oil, the immune-boosting power is multiplied. The researchers believe that the results of this study are definitely applicable to human health. They conclude that the study reinforces the health-promoting effects of habitual fish consumption. (25)

Salmon is a fish that naturally contains both fish oil and astaxanthin. I also recommending buying a fish oil supplement that contains astaxanthin.

The health benefits of fish oil can be incredible for the body’s largest organ, the skin. This source of essential fats improves the health and beauty of human skin in several ways. Fish oil benefits and nourishes the skin with fats and contributes fat-soluble vitamins that help skin maintain a smooth, elastic texture. There is also evidence that fish oil prevents wrinkles and works against the aging process.

The deficiency of EPA and DHA in diet contributes to skin conditions, such as dandruff, thinning hair, eczema and psoriasis, as well as age spots and sun spots. Without the essential fatty acids, too much moisture leaves the skin. The truth is your internal health can appear on your skin, and taking fish oil internally as a supplement may be as good as or better than applying conventional moisturizers.

In one study, individuals taking fish oil equivalent to 1.8 grams of EPA had a significant reduction in symptoms of eczema after 12 weeks. Researchers believe that these effects may be due to fish oil’s ability to reduce leukotriene B4, an inflammatory substance that plays a role in eczema. (26)

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, fish oil can aid in preventing or slowing heart disease, which is especially great for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis sufferers who are at a higher risk of developing heart disease. (27) When it comes to using fish oil supplements for the alleviation of psoriasis symptoms, studies have been mixed with some showing improvement but others showing no effect. If you suffer from psoriasis, you may want to try a fish oil supplement, or else I highly recommend that you make sure to have fish rich in omega-3s regularly.

One of the biggest reasons fish oil leads to healthier skin is definitely the fact that it can reduce inflammation. Research has shown that fish oil supplements can even reduce sun-induced inflammation and provide sunburn relief. “The sunburn response is markedly reduced by dietary fish oil rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. (28)

Recent studies have shown that the consumption of fish oil (or, more specifically, the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil) can improve fertility in both men and women. DHA, which is a byproduct of omega-3 fatty acids, plays a key role in the mobility of sperm and health of sperm in men. Low blood levels of DHA have been linked to decreased fertility. Animal studies have found that the DHA in fish is vital to changing dysfunctional round-headed sperm into strong swimmers with cone-shaped heads packed with egg-opening proteins. (29)

Fish oil has also been shown to increase fertility in women by reducing inflammation, balancing hormones and regulating their cycles. Also, fish oil has been found effective in treating conditions like polycystic ovarian syndrome and endometriosis, which can cause infertility.

Fish oil is also extremely beneficial for pregnant women and their children. Throughout pregnancy and also while breastfeeding, a woman’s omega-3 needs are even higher than usual. According to the American Pregnancy Association, most U.S. women are deficient in EPA and especially DHA going into pregnancy and get even more depleted during pregnancy, as the placenta supplies the fetus with DHA from the mother’s tissue. Omega-3 DHA is a critical building block of the fetal brain, eyes and nervous system. Once the baby is born, omega-3s continue to be vital to healthy brain development and immune function. (30)

Omega-3 fatty acids also seem to reduce the chance of premature delivery. (31) EPA and DHA intake can help support healthy labor and delivery outcomes. This omega-3 duo also helps normalize mood and overall well-being in the mother after giving birth.

Australian researchers published results of a study examining the effects of fish oil on weight loss in combination with diet and exercise in the May 2007 issue of American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The results show that a combination of fish oil supplements and regular exercise can reduce body fat while also improving heart and metabolic health. The fish supplementation group had lowered triglycerides, increased HDL cholesterol and improved blood flow. Overall, adding fish oil to a current exercise program (and a overall healthy lifestyle) looks like it can decrease body fat as well as cardiovascular disease risk. (32)

Another small study had all volunteers consume the same exact control diet and substituted fish oil for visible fats (things like butter and cream). The volunteers consumed six grams of fish oil each day for three weeks. They found that body fat mass decreased with the intake of fish oil. The researchers conclude that dietary fish oil reduces body fat and stimulates the use of fatty acids for the production of energy in healthy adults. (33a)

If you’ve been wondering, “What does fish oil do? hopefully you now have a better idea of the very large array of possible fish oil benefits!

IgA nephropathy is a common disease that causes end-stage renal failure and requires renal replacement therapy. A 2017 Journal of Clinical Medicine study concluded “that successful administration of EPA/aspirin combination therapy for treating IgA nephropathy might be a promising alternative to steroid replacement therapy. (33b)

The main nutritional value of fish oil is its high fatty acid content. As I just mentioned, fish oil benefits come from the fact that it’s rich in the omega-3 fatty acids known as DHA and EPA.

Wondering about the specifics of fish oil nutrition? One teaspoon (four grams) of fish oil from sardines, for example, contains approximately: (34)

Nutritional information varies by product and fish source. Check supplement labeling for specific details.

Many of Americans’ health problems can be traced back to having an imbalance of omega-3 and omega-6 fats. Omega-6 fats aren’t necessarily bad for you, but if they’re consumed in large amounts without omega-3s they cause inflammation, which leads to chronic illness.

Today, the average American has a 20:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats, when a healthy ratio is more ideally around 2:1. Put in other numerical terms, the typical American diet tends to contain 14 to 25 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. (35) This shows just how deficient most of us are and why supplementing with fish oil is so beneficial.

The biggest cause of omega-3 deficiency is the overconsumption of foods high in omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-6 comes from things like fried foods, fast foods and boxed foods that contain vegetables oils like soybean oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, cottonseed oil and corn oil. When you consume too much omega-6, it can decrease your body’s ability to metabolize healthy omega-3 fatty acids. (36)

Research has shown that having a lower ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids can reduce the risk of many common chronic diseases. Getting enough omega-3, which means having a proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6, has been shown in hundreds of studies to possibly provide benefits to many inflammatory diseases, including: (37a)

It’s also important to know that certain studies have shown that dietary fish oils rich in eicosapentaenoic acid actually lower the content of arachidonic acid (omega-6s) and its metabolites in plasma and tissue phospholipids. (37b)

Nonetheless, omega-6 fatty acids aren’t bad for you. In fact, if your diet contains too many omega-3 fatty acids, your immune system wouldn’t work very well. It’s all about the balance of these two essential fatty acids.

Note that even though certain other foods like flaxseeds and grass-fed beef contain omega-3 fats, those omegas are alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and not EPA/DHA like what’s found in fish oil. According to the medical research, there are far more health benefits in fish oil (EPA/DHA) than flax oil (ALA) for most people.

Your best way to achieve a good balance of omega-3 and omega-6 is by getting your fish oil from wild-caught fish like salmon. However, I still think it is beneficial for some to supplement with a high-quality omega-3 fish oil or cod liver oil. Plus, cold water fish are frequently contaminated with mercury and pesticide residues, making it very difficult to safely achieve recommended levels.

Therefore, supplementing your diet with pure antioxidant rich fish oil can be one of the best ways to get your omega 3s. The types of fish which are most commonly used in fish oil supplements are salmon, cod liver, mackerel, sardines, halibut, pollock and herring.

Currently, there isn’t a set standard recommendation for how many omega-3s we need each day, but suggestions range from a fish oil dosage of 500 to 1,000 milligrams daily depending on whom you ask. How easy is it to get these recommended amounts? To give you an idea, there are more than 500 milligrams of total omega-3s in one can of tuna fish and one small serving of wild-caught salmon.

When taking fish oil, more is not always better. Remember that you want it to stay in a balanced ratio with omega-6 fats. For most people, I recommend a 1,000-milligram dose of fish oil daily as a good amount and the most scientifically studied dosage. I highly recommend not taking more than that unless directed to under the supervision of a doctor.

Also, not all fish oils are created equal. Most fish oils are highly processed and can oxidize easily because omega-3 fats are polyunsaturated, have a low heat threshold and can easily go rancid. For that reason, you want to buy a fish oil in triglyceride form that also contains antioxidants to preserve them like astaxanthin or essential oils.

To improve the health of your heart, brain, skin, hair, body and much, much more, consider adding fish oil to your daily supplement regime or consume wild-caught fish daily. If you’re adverse to fish oil pills, make sure to get at least two servings of fatty fish each week to fulfill your omega-3 needs and provide your body with fish oil benefits. This is a recommendation also encouraged by the American Heart Association. (38)

Back in 2013, a study came out that made a lot of people concerned about fish oil supplements and cancer. The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, showed that men who consume the largest amount of fish oil had a 71 percent higher risk of high-grade prostate cancer and a 43 percent increase in all types of prostate cancer. The study was conducted on 2,227 men, of which 38 percent of the men already had prostate cancer. (39)

According to researcher Theodore Brasky from the Ohio State University Medical Center, “These fish oil supplements in which some men getting mega, mega doses in our opinion that is probably a little bit dangerous. (40)

What is a “mega dose? The American Heart Association considers taking up to three grams of fish oil per day “safe. It advises that “patients taking more than 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids from capsules should do so only under a physician’s care. (41) Most physicians would say that taking 2+ grams (or 2,000+ milligrams) daily is a mega dose.

So do I think you should stop taking your fish oil immediately because of this study? No. But should you take a look at how much fish oil you take and what brand you take? Yes, definitely.

The reason why fish oil could increase a man’s risk of prostate cancer is IMBALANCE. Like I said earlier, omega-6 fatty acids aren’t bad for you. In fact, if your diet contains too many omega-3 fatty acids, your immune system wouldn’t work very well because omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are meant to work in a system of checks and balances. Omega-3 fatty acids suppress inflammation, and omega-6 fatty acids promote inflammation, which actually supports your body’s natural system of defense like activating your white blood cells.

So, if you consume too many omega-3 fats (EPA/DHA) you can actually weaken your immune system, which would encourage rather than ward off cancer. So I take this study to be a very good example of why more is not more when it comes to supplements, and you should be cautious not to overdo it with fish oil or any other supplement.

 


 


If you’re not able to get enough fish oil benefits through your diet, fish oil supplements can be a good option. Fish oil side effects can include belching, bad breath, heartburn, nausea, loose stools, rash and nosebleeds, but in my experience, taking a high-quality fish oil supplement can reduce the likelihood of any unwanted side effects. It’s also a good idea to take fish oil with meals to reduce side effects.

Before taking fish oil, you should speak with your doctor if you currently take any medication or have any ongoing health concerns. You should also speak to your doctor before taking fish oil if you have a known fish or shellfish allergy.

If you have a bleeding disorder, bruise easily or take blood-thinning medications, you should use fish oil supplements with extra caution since large doses of omega-3 fatty acids can increase bleeding risk. This bleeding risk also applies to people with no history of bleeding disorders or current medication usage. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should only use fish oil supplements under your doctor’s supervision. Individuals with type 2 diabetes can experience increases in fasting blood sugar levels while taking fish oil supplements.

My estimate is that close to 90 percent of fish oils on the market today may contain mercury and pesticide residues plus hydrogenated oils. Of course, this is my opinion based on my own research from visiting different manufacturing plants, interviewing companies, and studying the research and the listed ingredients of typical fish oils. I would stay away from ALL fish oils that do not have antioxidants like astaxanthin, which help stabilize the oil from going rancid. I always look for astaxanthin as part of any high-quality fish oil supplement.

To avoid fish oil supplements containing mercury or other harmful contaminants, purchase supplements from a reputable source that clearly tests for these health-hazardous contaminants in its products. These tests should be ideally conducted by a third-party, and a certificate of analysis should indicate the levels of purity from environmental toxins.

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Omega-3 fatty acids, also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), are essential fatty acids, which are substances that the body cannot manufacture. They are vital to the human body function, and must be acquired through food. They play a crucial role in brain function, as well as normal growth and development.

Numerous studies have demonstrated the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids for the heart, decreasing the risk of heart disease. Other benefits include reduction of inflammation and may help lower the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and arthritis. They also favorably affect the skin.

Skin benefits from omega-3 fatty acids involve the epidermis, the skin’s outer layer. As we age, the cells become thinner and less sticky. This decreases the barrier function of the epidermis allowing moisture to be released from the skin, causing dryness. Also as epidermal cells start to decrease, the skin slowly loses its ability to repair itself efficiently. Simultaneously, the structural elements that support the skin start to thin. All of these changes promote wrinkling.

Omega-3 fatty acids bolster the skin cell membrane of the epidermis. The skin cell membrane is the outer layer of skin cell and it monitors the intake and disposal of nutrients and waste products entering and leaving the skin cell. The skin cell membrane also influences the ability of the cell to hold onto water. Therefore, if the skin cell holds onto water, it leads to moister, softer skin, which promotes wrinkle prevention and may eradicate existing mild wrinkles. Omega-3 fatty acids contribute to the upkeep of the skin cell membrane, improving the texture and quality of skin.

The sun’s ultraviolet light increases the aging process of the skin. Research has demonstrated that omega-3 fatty acids can play a role in decreasing skin damage from UV light and the production of cancer cells caused by the UV light. It has also been shown to contribute to wound healing because of anti-inflammatory properties. It has been used to treat atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and acne.

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish like salmon and mackerel, algae, krill, and certain plants and nut oils. Since these fatty acids have so many benefits for the skin, it seemed only logical that topical application in the form of a face cream could have even greater benefits. Omega-3 derived from fish oils became problematic in face creams because of the unmistakable and less than desirable fishy odor. Impurities, such as mercury, can also be present in omega-3 derived from fish. For these reasons, anti-aging facial creams are being developed with omega-3 derived from algae and or plants. After all, the fish get their omega-3 supply from eating algae.

One product due out this fall, Omega Earth and Sea, combines omega-3 fatty acids obtained from the sea, kalparine algae and the land, Echium seed oil, both rich sources omega-3, 6 and 9 fatty acids. Early reviews have been encouraging. Evaluations from consumers selected to try the product included improvement in skin firmness, tonicity and hydration level. 66.7 percent reported perceived smoother skin texture.

Research documents that dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids provide benefits to skin quality and it’s aging process. It appears that facial creams containing these fatty acids deliver the ingredient directly to the target, and provide similar benefits. I would like to see research exploring the possible benefits of combining topical and dietary omega-3 fatty acids with regard to skin health and aging. In any case, omega-3 fatty acids should be incorporated into your anti-aging armamentarium.

To learn more about my concepts regarding beauty and cosmetic surgery please go to the book’s website, www.TheBeautyQuotient.com, www.madisonps.com, or friend me on Facebook.



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Last updated on June 28th, 2017 at 11:20 am


Gone are the days when fats were held as the root cause of chronic diseases and health conditions like heart diseases, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, etc. Research has proved that there are certain kind of fats that are actually good for our health and in fact essential for proper functioning of the body. These are unsaturated fats or more precisely polyunsaturated fats like omega 3, omega 6 and omega 9 that helps in proper functioning of the skin, immune system, nervous system, respiratory system and circulatory system. Omega 3 is broken down as EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) in the body. These are highly unsaturated fats that are known to reduce inflammation, cure eye related problems, and improve heart health and memory power.


Health benefits of essential fatty acids are numerous, and the most important thing about these fatty acids such as omega 3, 6 and 9 are that they cannot be produced by the body itself and therefore it needs to be supplemented through external food sources. The basic health benefiting aspects have been stated below:

The EPA and DHA present in Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids help in lowering the risk of heart diseases, heart attacks and stroke by lowering the levels of triglyceride in  the blood by reducing LDL “bad cholesterol level and improving HDL “good cholesterol level. It also helps in regularizing heart beat and reducing blood clots. Omega 3 fatty acids also reduce inflammation and revoke the damage caused by harmful free radicals. One of the best ways to introduce omega 3 into daily diet is by taking fish oil omega 3 supplements.


Research shows that a regular intake of essential fatty acids like omega 3 from fish or fish oil capsules helps in controlling high blood pressure and hypertension effectively. Omega 3 also helps in improving heart health by reducing hardening of the arteries, increasing strength and elasticity of the arterial walls, reducing plaque and clot buildup and normalizing heartbeat.


Omega 3 fatty acids, especially DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is an excellent brain food that improves the communication between brain cells or neurons and helps in efficient brain functioning. DHA forms an important component of the grey matter of the brain and helps in maintaining the brain cell membranes in a fluid state that improves transmission of brain signals and information which in turn increases memory, concentration and performance and treats schizophrenia, depression related disorders like bipolar disorder, eating disorders, etc.


Most physicians prescribe omega 3 supplements to treat the symptoms of arthritis and osteoarthritis because it helps in reducing inflammation of the joints. Omega 3 fatty acids help in lowering joint stiffness, joint pain and inflammation. It also helps in improving bone strength, grip strength, walking pace by increasing calcium levels in the body. It prevents bone loss and decay and minimizes the risk of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women.


When it comes to skin care, omega 3 6 9 benefits for skin in such a way that it helps in turning the skin smoother. Most of us run after expensive beauty products blindly but in reality, head to toe healthy skin can be achieved only if you are feeding your skin with the right nutrients from within. Diet plays an extremely important role in improving skin conditions and a diet rich in omega 3 “the good fat can help in improving skin texture, smoothness and skin tone. It supports the skin cell membranes to retain moisture so that skin appears softer, supple and younger looking. It also reduces the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles and age spots from the skin to give it a beautiful, younger looking appearance.


 


A diet rich in omega 3, 6 and 9 helps in effective weight loss. The essential fatty acids work in a two-way process to promote weight loss. While omega 3 speeds up the metabolism that helps the body to burn stored fat at a faster rate, omega 6 and omega 9 supports the functioning of the brain and heart that improves digestion and oxidation of fats. While fish oil is a good source of omega 3, omega 6 and 9 are found in abundance in flaxseed oil.


Although fish oil and flaxseeds are the best natural sources of essential fatty acids, there are several other plant-based sources that also supply a considerable amount of omega 3 to the body.

Flaxseeds are the number one source of plant based omega 3 fatty acids and the most abundant omega 3 fatty acid found in flaxseeds is ALA or alpha-linolenic acid. Health benefits of flax seeds are numerous- the most important being the maintenance of cardiovascular health, it protects the blood vessels and arteries against inflammation, reduce oxidative stress. The anti-inflammatory aspect of flaxseeds makes it an active agent for cancer prevention and it reduces the risk of breast, colon and prostate cancer considerably. It also helps in improving digestive health and treats post- menopausal problems.

Although it is important to include flaxseeds or flaxseed oil in our daily diet but people might face difficulties in coming up with innovative recipes that include flax seeds, therefore Inlife has brought a 100% natural flaxseed oil substitute – Flaxseed Oil Capsule that is a rich source of omega 3,6 and 9. The best thing about the capsule is that the fatty acids can be properly absorbed in the body without losing its bioavailability. Being a plant based source of omega 3, 6 and 9 it is ideal for those who don’t eat fish. Each capsule contains pure extra virgin cold pressed flaxseed oil that help in improving overall health, maintaining heart health, controlling blood glucose levels, joint pains, enhancing brain functions and promoting weight loss.


Chia seeds are yet another important source of heart healthy ALA omega 3 fatty acids. Both omega 3 and 6 are essential fatty acids that can’t be produced by our body on its own yet omega 3 is a more precious one because it is difficult to find this nutrient in foods whereas omega 6 is readily available in nuts, fruits and vegetables. The essential fatty acids in chia seeds helps in reducing blood cholesterol by lowering the level of LDL “bad cholesterol and triglycerides while increasing the level of HDL “good cholesterol. It also helps in reducing inflammation, lowering blood pressure and controlling blood glucose level.


Walnut is an excellent source of enhancing memory. It is also called as brain food and is a great source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids that help in improving heart health and lowering cholesterol from the blood . Being a plant source of essential fatty acids, the omega 3 is in the form of ALA. ALA or Alpha-linolenic acid helps in reducing LDL cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood, lowering inflammation, minimizing the risk of heart attacks and stroke. If you have a poor memory power and are unable to remember things walnut is the best source in enhancing memory power. So throw in a few nuts in your bag and munch on this healthy snack whenever you feel hungry.


Eggs are a great non-vegetarian source of omega 3 fatty acids and a great substitute for those who don’t eat fish. The long chain omega 3 present in eggs helps in preventing auto-immune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, protects against heart diseases, reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes and improves vision. It helps in increasing the level of HDL “good cholesterol while lowering the level of triglycerides and LDL “bad cholesterol in blood.


Fish oil is one of the richest sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially omega 3 and its health benefits are numerous. It not only helps in relieving inflammation, arthritis, joint pains and heart diseases, but the EPA and DHA in omega 3 works together to promote weight loss by boosting the metabolism to speed up fat burning. It also helps in proper cell functioning and cell regeneration that reduces skin aging. Fish oil omega 3 also helps in improving bone strength and preserving lean muscles.

Certain sea fishes like Arctic Char, Wild Salmon, Atlantic Mackerel are a great source of omega 3 but it is more effective to take in fish oil omega 3 in the form of omega 3 supplements or capsules, and this can be effectively done with Inlife’s Fish Oil Capsule made from pure fish oil extracted from sardine fish. Each capsule contains 180 mg of EPA and 120 mg of DHA. These capsules help in direct absorption of the omega 3 fatty acid by the body which does not undergo any further breakdown by the body.


Spinach is a rich plant source of essential fatty acids which are easily available to everyone. The omega 3 fatty acids in spinach have amazing anti-inflammatory properties and helps in reducing the risk of chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. It also helps in improving memory , boosting brain performance, increasing concentration and efficiency, while the anti-oxidant properties of this leafy vegetables helps in reducing the harmful effects of oxidative stress on blood vessels and arteries.


Add these foods to your daily diet or include omega 3 supplements like Inlife’s Flax Seed Oil and Fish Oil capsules to your health regime and keep chronic diseases like heart problems, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, weight gain, stress and fatigue at bay.

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